Forestry

Climate refugees in Tuvalu: transferable lessons from the multi-stakeholder processes of community forestry

Climate refugees in Tuvalu: transferable lessons from the multi-stakeholder processes of community forestry

Climate change is a major concern for nations within the Pacific Ocean. Low-lying countries, such as Tuvalu, are some of the most at risk for facing the realities of climate change.

Photo courtesy of Peter Buschmann, United States Forest Service, USDA. Some additional editing by W.carter., Woolsey Fire - tree ridge in flames 20181119-PB-008, marked as public domain, more details on Wikimedia Commons

Fighting Fire with Fire by the Karuk Tribe: Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Wildfire Management

The Karuk Tribe has been occupying its traditional land for centuries in the middle section of the Klamath River in California. This case study is about struggle between the U.S. Forest Service and the Karuk Tribe as it tries to reintroduce its management practices over its traditional territory.

Codex, Terminal Transmountain Pipeline 2, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Alberta to British Columbia Trans Mountain Expansion Project

The Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project is controversial as it may potentially have adverse effects environmentally, economically, and socially. The Tsleil-Waututh community voted to oppose the Expansion Project in a pioneering example of First Nations acting on their authority to review and decide whether a project should proceed in their territory.

Dimitrios Tzortzis, A boat rests unused near the Acheloos river delta, CC BY-SA 4.0

Roles and impacts of stakeholder networks on Europe’s Natura 2000 programme

The European Ecological Network called Natura 2000 is the world’s largest multinational-coordinated conservation infrastructure of protected areas. It is governed by a science-based top-down supranational legislative framework which sets similar conservation objectives across the Member States.

USAID Biodiversity & Forestry, USAID Measuring Impact Conservation Enterprise Retrospective (Guatemala; Rainforest Alliance) (38494893700), marked as public domain, more details on Wikimedia Commons

Community Forest Management in the Maya Biosphere Reserve

Petén was considered the last agricultural, immigration, and geopolitical frontier of Guatemala by the 1990s. Today, it holds 30% of the country’s maize production and 20% of the nation’s cattle production.

Raina Sunggiardi, Wuyi palace, marked as public domain, more details on Wikimedia Commons

An Assessment of the History and Stakeholders’ Involvement in Heritage Tourism in Wuyi Mountain, Fujian, China

This case study is about Wuyi Mountain in Fujian province, China, and covers the development of tourism in since the tenure reforms and opening up of China, beginning in 1978.

Conservation of Zhangjiajie National Forest in China: protection or exploitation

Conservation of Zhangjiajie National Forest in China: protection or exploitation

Zhangjiajie park accounts for 27.67% of the total tree species in Hunan province. Forests have become a significant source of revenue for the nation as more tourists visit the forests. The number of tourists and revenue have increased by 20% and 43.6% annually.

Jonathan Wilkins, Detail of mangrove roots, CC BY-SA 3.0

Community based co-management of mangrove forest in Dongzhaigang National Nature Reserve, Hainan province, China

The establishment of this nature reserve has made important contributions to the restoration of mangrove wetland, biodiversity conservation and disaster prevention and mitigation.

The shift towards bottom-up forestry: A case study of the Ukrainian Carpathian Mountain range communities

The shift towards bottom-up forestry: A case study of the Ukrainian Carpathian Mountain range communities

This case study explores the overall systems of tenure, administrative arrangements and various stakeholder groups that are involved in the Ukrainian Carpathian Mountain forested regions between 1991 and 2014.

Jlh249, Casa Shuar, Logroño, CC BY-SA 3.0

Why the struggles of the Shuar Indigenous People in Ecuador to conserve their culture are key to local conservation

The Shuar were the first Indigenous people in Latin America to establish a formal indigenous organization, serving as an example to indigenous groups all over the region fighting for their territories.